Week 5 – # 15 High Key

White Flower

Following my tradition, I am  ready to take photos but of course, it is raining again, so I am now tackling the photography technique called High Key.  So what is High Key?  High Key photography involves a large amount of light tones and fewer mid-tones or shadows.  High key photography uses unnaturally bright lighting to blow out most or all harsh shadows in an image.  But be careful – I do not mean that you should have any blown or over exposed portions.  You should not have any “Blinkies”.

High key methods were originally developed as a solution to screens that couldn’t properly display high contrast ratios, but has developed into more of a stylistic choice. This method is perfect for a subject that is funny, lighthearted or beautiful.

High key photography seeks to eliminate harsh shadows and create a bright environment. It is generally used to convey an upbeat, funny or beautiful subject but can be manipulated to communicate a number of moods and concepts.

You see high key used regularly for model photography, flowers and other subjects that are relatively feminine in nature. Another area perfect for high key is product photography. Practically speaking, the bright nature of the photo really highlights the product and can make for some great attention-grabbing contrast. Psychologically speaking, a product shown on white tends to suggest that it is high quality or upscale in nature.

This photo was taken at ISO 100, at 98mm, F6.3, with EV +1 2/3, 0.4 sec, Aperture priority, Spot metering.  Now I do not have a studio, so this was done in my dining room, on the table, with a white sheet on the table and one end raised up for the backdrop.  I also do not have studio lighting so this was done with lamps, floor and regular, two behind the flower to light the backdrop, and two on either side of the camera, one higher than the camera and one even with it.  I tried to keep it as simple as possible working with just what I had (other than getting the flower).

Week 4 – # 26 Light and Airy

26 - Light & Airy-2

 

Again playing with different lighting, I was trying to light the flower and to create the shadow that looked more like a tree shadow.  The light has to be bright enough and high enough but not too high or too bright to make the shadow fall apart.  Of course, I had to rig a wire to hold the flower and that had to be erased. I then took this into Topaz Adjust to give the photo an overall light salmon colored tinge.

The starkness of the single flower and the shadow  is what drew me to try to photograph this.  The petals give the light and airy feel in the  shadow with the different  layers of light bleeding through.

It’s raining  (again) and what better than to play with my camera and determine what kind of lighting to get my desired effects.